What you need to know about the hearing aid revolution

This week, the hearing aids revolution continues as the Supreme Court hears oral arguments in two lawsuits over the Supreme Health Care Act.

The Supreme Court is hearing the suit against the American Hearing Association, and it’s likely to rule soon on the other two cases.

The hearing in the AHA case, filed by AHA President and CEO Bob Young and members of the hearing association, is scheduled to begin at 9:00 AM ET on Friday.

Young is asking the Supreme court to allow him to call his claim that hearing aids cause a “substantial” loss of hearing to the Supreme hearing-aid panel, which is comprised of a lawyer, two medical doctors, and an attorney for the hearing-association.

The hearing is expected to last up to two hours.

The AHA lawsuit against the ACA was filed in February and seeks to force the federal government to stop using the terms “hybrid” or “hybrids” to describe hearing aids that use a combination of technology and a hearing-appliance.

In the AHTA lawsuit, the plaintiffs also argue that the AHR Act does not permit the hearing and hearing-loss industries to continue to be covered under the ACA.

The Hearing Assurance Act, signed into law by President Barack Obama in 2013, provides $1.2 trillion in grants and loans to the hearing arts industry, and the AHCA argues that the government should not be allowed to exclude the hearing industry from this funding, because its equipment is “hygienic and safe.”

The AHA is challenging the law, arguing that it unfairly restricts the availability of hearing aids for consumers and consumers of hearing aid.

The other case in the hearing is filed by the American Association of Hearing Attendants.

The AHTAA claims that the ACA’s requirement that insurance companies cover “hygenic” hearing aids is unlawful because it violates the Americans with Disabilities Act.